View more on these topics

Yorkshire targets teenage savers

Yorkshire Building Society is targeting the teenage market with a savings account paying 3.89 per cent a year gross. The Freedom account is available to savers between the ages of 12 and 21 and can be opened with deposits of just £10 while the maximum is £500,000. A cash card will be provided to allow consumers immediate access to their money while parents will be allowed to set a limit on monthly withdrawals.

Recommended

&#39Too few divorcees use pension splitting&#39

A new pension underclass is developing because divorcees are not taking advantage of pension-splitting legislation, warns national IFA Inter-Alliance subsidiary Professional Alliance.More than 300,000 divorces have taken place since the regulations came into effect in December 2000 but fewer than 1 per cent of these have resulted in pension-sharing orders, according to figures from the […]

Live wires plug into the pension problem

IFAs advising on pensions are facing a critical time. Many industry commentators feel the Government&#39s Pensions Green Paper does not go far enough towards fixing the problems in the market or providing a stable framework for the future.At the Money Marketing Live conference at London&#39s Olympia on May 13, ABI head of pensions and savings […]

Advisers demand rebroking redress

IFAs are demanding that the Prudential pay compensation for the time they will have to spend rebroking criticalillness policies following the life off-ice&#39s decision to remove guarantees and raise premiums on new and pipeline business.Advisers say they face rebroking dozens and, in some cases, hundreds of policies and they plan to send invoices to the […]

Homeowners&#39 child savings plan meets Sandler criteria

Homeowners Friendly Society is offering a children&#39s savings plan it says meets Ron Sandler&#39s recommendations for simple low-cost products.The friendly society says its Better Start child savings plan is aimed at giving people of all income levels the chance to save for their children and follows recent independent research by Homeowners.The research shows that while […]

Japan Economic Insight

James Dowey, Chief Economist, and Paul Caruana-Galizia, Economist

The conventional wisdom is that following a roughly 50 per cent rise in the stock market in 2013 in Yen terms, the Japan trade is over and done*. So the story goes, those big gains were due to a one-off boost from quantitative easing (QE) and a depreciation of the Yen — policies that one should think of as a palliative to Japan’s economic weakness, but not a cure. Rather the cure, and by implication the necessary condition for a longer-term investment case, is deep structural reforms — a painstaking re-weaving of Japan’s economic and social fabric, no less. The story continues: this is a much tougher test than launching a blast of QE, and one that prime minister Shinzo Abe, although well intentioned and well supported by the public thus far, is likely to fail. Stick a fork in Japan, it’s done…continue reading

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment