View more on these topics

‘We were aware of TCF… but what about the cost?’: How Clydesdale failed customers

Clydesdale Bank is facing a bill of £42m to deal with its miscalculation of mortgage rates and subsequent failings in its redress scheme.

The bank has to pay an £8.9m FCA fine by October 14 as well as writing off mortgage underpayments and organising a redress scheme.

In April 2009 the bank realised mortgage rates were being wrongly calculated whenever there was an interest rate change affecting 42,000 customers and leaving a £21.2m shortfall.

In September 2009 it corrected the IT error and began writing to customers to inform them how they may have been affected.

The FCA final notice, published today, details how Clydesdale ignored Financial Ombudsman Service guidance to write off customer shortfalls. Around 600 complaints were referred to the FOS about Clydesdale’s mortgage errors, most of which were upheld.

The FCA says Clydesdale balanced commercial interests alongside Treating Customers Fairly rules and did not make it clear to customers that it was at fault for the error.

The impact left many customers facing increases of more than £500 a month to their mortgage payments to ensure they could still pay off their mortgage on time.

Here we outline some of the key failings of Clydesdale Bank and how these impacted customers:

Inadequate redress scheme

Clydesdale paid or credited £3.6m in redress to affected customers but the FCA says it should have been more if it had communicated its errors more clearly.

The bank sent information suggesting customers were still on course to repay their mortgages at the end of the agreed term.

The FCA says the bank took “too long” to correct the situation and did not make it clear to customers that the mistake was the bank’s fault.

It also suggested customers had “no option” but to make up the shortfall, when they could have rejected the extra payments.

“We were all very aware of TCF, the FOS position but…”

FOS guidance relating to lender errors in calculating mortgage rates is to repay shortfalls in full but Clydesdale ignored its advice.

An internal email sent on 3 August 2009 stated: ”We all agreed the issue is very complex and difficult to get right from all perspectives. We were all very aware of TCF, FOS position, but also the commercial view – if we basically said “sorry for the mistake and we have adjusted your account, but going foirward [sic] your payment will be £x” then the costs could be as much as £25m…

“I realise there are TCF considerations but the amounts for the majority are relatively low, so we should be able to point out our error as part of the review and move the cases back to a correct payment strategy going forward.”

£18,500 mortgage shortfall

The error affected 42,648 mortgage accounts, around one third of Clydesdale’s mortgage book.

Of these accounts, Clydesdale identified that 21,844 had capital shortfalls as a result of underpayments.

The impact of the error varied significantly between different customers.

One customer had a capital shortfall of £18,501 while another had a shortfall of less than £20. The average capital shortfall was £970.

£500 increases to monthly mortgage payments

As a result of capital shortfalls, Clydesdale customers were faced with various payment options to make up the difference and ensure they paid off their mortgage on time:

  • For 3,719 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of under £2
  • For 1,907 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of between £2 to £5
  • For 1,815 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of between £5 to £10
  • For 7,040 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of between £10 to £50
  • For 3,535 mortgage accounts, there a monthly increase of between £50 to £100
  • For 2,409 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of between £100 to £200
  • For 1,247 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of between £200 to £500
  • For 172 mortgage accounts, there was a monthly increase of over £500.

Recommended

Home-House-US-Dollars-USA-700x450.jpg

JP Morgan seeks $4bn settlement to US misselling claims

JP Morgan Chase is in discussions with the US regulator to settle allegations it missold mortgage-backed securities. The Financial Times reports the bank is looking to settle through a single $4bn (£2.5bn) payment covering all outstanding allegations from state and federal task forces. The allegations involve a lawsuit from the New York attorney-general along with […]

Money-Cash-Coins-GBP-Pounds-UK-700x450.jpg

Michael Johnson: Aggregation could boost pension incomes 13%

Centre for Policy Studies research fellow Michael Johnson says his radical plan to consolidate people’s pensions could increase retirement incomes by 13 per cent. Earlier this month, the CPS published a paper, titled ‘Aggregation Is The Key’, calling on the Department for Work and Pensions to abandon the proposed pot follows member reforms, whereby a […]

Business-Corporate-Commuters-People-700x450.jpg
1

ONS reveals 400,000 drop in pension scheme membership

The number of people paying into a workplace pension scheme dropped 400,000 last year, from 8.2 million in 2011 to 7.8 million in 2012, as the Government’s automatic enrolment reforms were rolled out for the UK’s largest employers. Auto-enrolment began in October last year, requiring all employers to offer a workplace pension to their employees. […]

Can you put a hat on?

By Sarah Scott, marketing consultant You might think the question in the title is a strange one. Perhaps even more so when you learn that it’s one of several asked as part of an assessment for Employment Support Allowance eligibility in the opening scenes of the 2016 film, ‘I, Daniel Blake’. Daniel is a carpenter […]

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

There are 4 comments at the moment, we would love to hear your opinion too.

  1. We have a word for such bank people who continually make cockups…numpties!

  2. Is it just me or does anyone else not think that the bigger issue is that this bank cannot carry out the most basic of banking functions, namely, calculating interest? If it can’t actually do this bit correctly goodness only knows what else is amiss.

  3. There are some banks that I wouldn’t touch with somebody else’s barge pole, this being one of them.

    Saying that I can’t think of a bank that I’d be fully confident in these days.

  4. Centaur comment testing.

    Please ignore.

Leave a comment