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UCB Home Loans – Buy-to Let Three Year Flexible Fixed Rate

UCB Home Loans

Buy-to-Let Three Year Flexible Fixed Rate

Type: Fixed-rate buy-to-let mortgage

Fixed term: Three years

Fixed rate: 5.19%

Minimum loan: £25,001

Maximum loan: Up to 85% of valuation subject to a maximum of £350,000, up to 80% of valuation subject to a maximum of £500,000, up to 75% of valuation subject to a maximum of £600,000

Income multiples: Up to 3.25 times principal income plus second or 2.75 times joint plus 6.5 times annual rental income

Conditions: Maximum of two properties allowed
Flexible features: Overpayments of up to £500 a month, underpayments, payment holidays, lump sum withdrawals, interest calculated daily

Arrangement fee: £495 plus £75 reservation fee for remortgages

Redemption fee: Six months’ interest in year one, five months; interest in year two, four months’ interest in year three

Introducer’s fee: Subject to negotiation

Tel: 0845 940 1400

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