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Tories would allow public to nominate unpopular regulations

Conservative Shadow Business Secretary Ken Clarke has revealed a future Tory Government would allow the public to nominate unpopular regulations to be reviewed by Parliament.

Speaking yesterday at the Conservative conference in Manchester, Clarke announced a number of measures that would be taken to cut red tape, including setting up a star chamber in Parliament to ensure any new laws must include cuts in old laws which create a net 5 per cent reduction in regulation. The chamber would be chaired by Clarke.

Clarke also pledged to add a sunset clause to all regulators and regulatory quangos and strengthen Parliamentary accountability of regulators and inspectorates.

The Tories would publish detailed information about the expenditure and outcomes achieved by local councils, curb the powers of intrusive inspectors and consult on changes that may be required to the employment and discrimination tribunals system.

Clarke said: “New Labour has been a burden and a handicap on business that we can no longer afford. The world of New Labour is more bureaucratic than anything we have ever known. An over-powerful executive, bigger government, an ungovernable bureaucracy. We all feel it in our daily lives. Businesses, in particular small businesses, face far more than their fair share of it.

“How much does it cost? Estimates vary. Everyone agrees it is a great and still growing burden. For our entrepreneurs it is not just money, it is wasted time.”

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Comments

There are 2 comments at the moment, we would love to hear your opinion too.

  1. Music to my ears………..
    …and to many others who are sick and tired of all the red tape, http://www.cutthisredtape.com

  2. Tories would allow public to nominate unpopular regulations
    When Tony Blair first took office (or maybe shortly before) he declared that Labour’s number one priority would be EDUCATION, EDUCATION, EDUCATION. But, as we now know, what he really meant was REGULATION, REGULATION, REGULATION. And that is exactly what we got, by the boatload, in every walk of life imaginable. Regulation is now a national industry, employing untold thousands of people of widely varying ability and integrity, all milking the industries they regulate for every penny they can screw out of them. Wouldn’t it be nice if the next government were to give the country the opportunity to vote in a referendum on the FSA as well as on Europe? We can but hope.

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