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Thinc and Destini piece the jigsaw together

When Thinc and Destini merge in April it will create one of the biggest five advisory firms in the country, with annual turn-over of between 40m and 50m.

The partnership will bring together two comp-anies from opposing sides of the depolarisation spectrum in a move aimed at offering a complete package to the consumer.

Thinc’s senior management have previously worked within a tied environment and always in-tended to multi-tie while Destini has previously operated under the banner of IFA.

Both Destini operations director Jon Everill and Thinc national sales director Nick Boyle agree there will be no conflict of interests when the merger takes place. They say it will offer the consumer every possible option in the aftermath of depolarisation.

Everill says the merger will be like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle coming together to create a better consumer environment.

Boyle says the new de-polarisation rules have created a huge blurring of issues, with advisers allow-ed to wear both a multi-tie and an IFA hat when advising clients. He says this can confuse the consumer and has the potential to cause difficulties regarding the FSA’s drive to treat customers fairly.

Thinc Destini will have multi-tied advisers and IFAs working side by side but there will be no cross-over. Advisers will be either an IFA or multi-tied but not both, says Boyle.

Everill anticipates that about 80 per cent of Thinc Destini’s income will come from its multi-tie advisers. He believes the problem with the IFA sector is that it is undercapitalised as many are run as small life-style businesses.

He says Destini looked at the alternatives available through depolarisation and realised that merging Thinc was the answer to all the potential problems.

Everill goes on to say that many IFAs act as if they are multi-ties anyway, focusing on six or seven product providers without being transparent.

He also believes that there will be a general migration of IFAs to multi-tie in the future.

Boyle says IFAs need to get over the stigma of multi-ties, claiming many advisers do not understand the concept properly.

Thinc Destini is anticipating a large recruitment drive of advisers after April and is also hoping to expand through more acquisitions.

Boyle says: “We are ahead of our time and many other firms will be looking to see what happens to us. If we are successful our model will be copied by others.”

Everill says: “Those who refuse to look at the new opportunities created by depolarisation, because they have their heads in the sand, will be left behind and will struggle in the future.”

The firm will offer advisers career progression by training them up to work in the sector of the market they see their long term future in, whether it is independent, multi-tie or through the network arm.

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