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Tech firm FNZ takes stake in robo-adviser

Sprouting-Money-Growth-Emerging-Currency-700.jpgTechnology firm FNZ has invested in robo-adviser Advicefront, which is also backed by other leading financial planning figures.

FNZ today announced it has completed a strategic investment in the company.

Advicefront, which is an automated advice platform, started in 2015 and its original investors include former Bloomsbury Financial Planning principal Jason Butler, Tilney investment director Charles McKinnon and consultant Brett Davidson, who is director of FP Advance.

FNZ doubles profits after scoring big name platform projects

FNZ chief executive Adrian Durham says: “We’re really excited about the potential for Advicefront’s technology to help ambitious financial services firms serve more clients, in a cost-effective way, while retaining the all-important human touch that customers want.”

Advicefront founder and chief executive Jose Supico says: “Having a company of FNZ’s calibre as a strategic investor in our business gives us the resources and support to accelerate our growth, so we can help more advice firms to reach more customers in a sustainable and profitable way.”

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