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Standard stands by review timetable

Standard Life believes the Government’s timetable for reviewing automatic enrolment and Nest could go ahead in 2017 despite reforms being delayed for small firms.

The review will assess auto-enrolment and Nest, including a contribution cap of £4,200 and the ban on transfers in and out.

Standard head of pensions policy John Lawson says: “I am not convinced there is any need to delay the review. By 2017, even most of the firms with fewer than 50 employees will come under the scope of the reforms and the Nest contribution cap will have done its job. The new Parliament starts in 2015, so that gives two years of enrolment of small employers before the review.”

Institute of Directors senior pensions policy adviser Malcolm Small says: “It is possible the Government will review auto-enrolment and Nest based on early learnings in 2017 but it is more likely we will see a review after the project has been rolled out to everyone, which could be as late as 2021.”


Thames thinks small for better performance

Thames River Multi-Capital says smaller funds tend to consistently outperform because they take sufficient risk, unlike many of their bigger counterparts. In its latest Fundwatch survey, the multi-manager looked at the size and performance of funds in all 33 IMA sectors over three years to September 30. It found that in two-thirds of the sectors, […]


New figures reveal the extent of Arch cru investor losses

Figures revealing the fall in the value of Arch cru funds before the range was suspended in March 2009 show investors may only receive around 40 per cent of their investment from the FSA’s compensation package. The FSA agreed a £54m compensation package for Arch cru investors with Capita Financial Managers, BNY Mellon Trust & […]

Value remains within European equities

By Rob Burnett, Neptune European Opportunities Fund

In recent months, investors have become more pessimistic about both the European and the US economic outlook and yet stockmarkets have pushed on to new highs. Some would argue that this is a worrying divergence. We would take the opposite view. This appears to be classic bull market behaviour. A wall of worry has been rebuilt, and stockmarket resilience should be taken as a sign of strength. The market is discounting an improving economic outlook ahead, particularly in the south of Europe.


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