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Skipton Intermediaries – Buy-To-Let 2 Year Base Rate Tracker to 70% LTV

Skipton Intermediaries – Buy-To-Let 2 Year Base Rate Tracker to 70% LTV

Type: Buy-to-let tracker

Tracker term: Two years

Tracker rate: Bank of England Base Rate plus 3.69%

Payable rate: 4.19%

Minimum loan: No minimum

Maximum loan: Up to 70% of valuation subject to a maximum of £500,000

Income multiples: Rental income must be at least 125% of the mortgage repayments calculated at 6%

Conditions: Capital repayments of up to 10% a year allowed without penalty in the fixed-rate period, free valuation up to £615 for properties valued up to £500,000 and free legal fees for remortgages, up to five properties allowed with the Skipton Group within a total maximum of £1m, up to 10 properties with all lenders

Arrangement fee: £750 completion fee plus £245 application fee

Redemption fee: 3% of the amount repaid plus interest to the end of the month

Introducer’s fee: Refer to lender

Tel: 0800 876601

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