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SFO urges Kaupthing whistleblowers to step forward

The Serious Fraud Office has asked people who have inside knowledge of Kaupthing to step forward, following the leak of the bank’s loan book on the Wikileaks website over the weekend.

The SFO says it is still deciding whether to launch an official investigation into Icelandic banks and the inquiry is still at the ‘research stage’.

The leaked document detailed huge sums allegedly lent to clients who were known to be major shareholders in the company.

A SFO spokesman says: “There are difficulties in terms of jurisdiction but two thirds of the loan book of the bank were loaned to people in the UK. It would be useful to get out our message that if people have information that they think is something we should know about they should contact us.”

The SFO says it has already received information relating to the operations of the bank.

“We have been looking at some of the transactions and this dovetailed with some of the information which was in the leaked document.

“That document was a snapshot of information and is by no means a complete picture so we’re still very much interested in hearing from people who have inside knowledge of the bank, its operations and/or people who were lent money and others involved,” says the spokesman.

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