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Scottish Friendly sales up

Scottish Friendly Assurance has announced new business sales of £17m in 2000, an increase of over 25 per cent compared with 1999.

IFAs continued to play a part in Scottish Friendly&#39s sales growth with life and pension sales up 26 per cent.

Scottish Friendly chief executive Bob Thomson says: “We have utilised our strength as a small and nimble organisation to notch up another year of record sales. Our investment performance is more than a match for our larger competitors. we are growing rapidly.”

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