View more on these topics

Ruffer Investment Management – CF Ruffer Pacific Fund

Type:
Oeic

Aim:
Growth by investing in equities and bonds in the Asia Pacific region

Minimum investment:
Lump sum £1,000

Investment split:
34% cash, 16% basic materials, 12% non-cyclical consumer goods, 11% financial,9% cyclical consumer goods, 5% communications, 4% industrial, 3% utilities, 2% energy, 2% government, 2% other

Isa link: Yes

Pep transfers: Yes

Charges:
Initial 5%,
annual 1.5%

Commission:
Initial 3%,
renewal 0.5%

Tel: 020 7529 7936

Recommended

Final Menu rules due second half of year

The FSA plans to publish its final rules in the second half of the year, when it will unveil its policy statement giving feedback on the consultation. The consultation finishes on June 1, after which the FSA will review the responses and amend its draft rules accordingly. As the Menu is key part of the […]

Baggers win the battle

Carpetbaggers won a famous victory at Nationwide last Wednesday night, but mutual watchers need not fret – it was all in a good cause. The scene was a Nationwide quiz night for the press held at Madame Tussauds, where the winners were a team from The Independent called The Malevolent Carpetbaggers. The Diary hears that […]

Invesco funds make up 12% of Cofunds assets

Invesco Perpetual funds account for more than 12 per cent of Cofunds&#39 £2bn of assets under management, with the group&#39s high-income fund responsible for 3.5 per cent. Invesco leads the field with 12.4 per cent of assets, with Jupiter on 9.7 per cent, Artemis 7.9 per cent and New Star 6.8 per cent. Fidelity, which […]

Correspondent&#39s week

Life, some wit once said, is God&#39s way of laughing at our plans. So, having registered with the Almighty&#39s database that I never wanted to work on a newspaper relaunch again, I have effectively been through three since I joined The Independent less than three years ago. The latest, a compact version of the Save […]

taxes

Out from the long grass? An IT and NI merger

Those with a long memory will recall that at the start of the last parliamentary term George Osborne announced his intention to merge income tax (IT) and national insurance (NI).  Headline grabbing as the initiative was, the reality of the complexities, challenges and costs of such a move resulted in this idea being kicked into the political long grass.

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment