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Reita appoints IPF’s Keane as first director

Reita, the industry body for real estate investment trusts, has appointed former Investment Property Forum executive director Amanda Keane as its first director.

Keane will work at within the British Property Federation with Dave Butler, who is moving from his position as Reita programme co-ordinator to become head of external affairs.

Reita chairman Patrick Sumner says Keane brings “tremendous experience” and a “great reputation” to her new employer. He says: “She brings a new dimension to Reita, and will give us the capability to increase our influence across the property industry in these challenging times and, together with Dave Butler, the capacity to rapidly ramp up our activities as the market returns.”

BPF chief executive Liz Peace says: “I am really looking forward to working with Amanda, and to seeing how we can most effectively co-ordinate our activities to build on our combined expertise and make best use of the resources across Reita and the BPF”.

Amanda Keane says: “Reita has achieved a great deal since its launch in August 2006 and I am very excited to be joining the team. I will be looking to see how we can continue to build on this success and to increase our influence across our industry.”

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