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RBS beats BoS pay

Royal Bank of Scotland has been paying its top executives up to 70 per cent more than rival Bank of Scotland.


Last year RBS chief executive Sir George Mathewson was paid a total of £836,000 while his BoS counterpart Peter Burt received just £486,000.


RBS also revealed it had paid its former finance director Bob Spiers a discretionary retirement bonus payment of £575,395..


Both banks are embroiled in the takeover battle for National Westminster Bank.

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What employers should expect over the next five years

A major feature of our articles is looking into the Jelf Employee Benefits crystal ball to predict changes and trends that may influence the short and medium term shape of UK employee benefits.  By flagging such changes early we aim to provide our followers with the tools to make sensible and informed decisions on their benefits offerings.

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