View more on these topics

Pro bono process

The letter from Tony Conner, Joss Harwood and Owen Temple in Money Marketing (February 10) contains a number of misconceptions about the nature of the pilot scheme with Citizens’ Advice to offer the public pro bono generic advice.

First, it is just not true that I have implied that IFAs are “congenitally unsuited to pro bono work. The point I made is that many are reluctant to do it. Money Marketing’s findings in Broker Talkback in the same issue would seem to underline this point.

Second, I do not think anyone has suggested that the scheme is providing advice on debt problems. Quite the contrary, it is for Citizens’ Advice to continue to advise people with debt problems and the advisers who are assisting with this pilot will be offering generic advice, with an emphasis on savings.

Third, the sum which the CII has put in is a contribution to the costs of managing the scheme. For example, it needs to have a project manager and there will need to be proper reports. There is a steering group, of which I am a member, and that must carry out its work. The training needed in some cases must be paid for somehow.

We should stop arguing about the mechanics of this scheme and think about how there can be further outreach to offer generic advice. IFAs which are reluctant to get involved in this are frankly a considerable disappointment. Our outreach to the public and our reputation depend on a much more positive approach.

John EllisPublic affairs director,Personal Finance Society,London

Recommended

House price inflation trending down

UK house price inflation rate fell from 13.7 per cent in November to 10.7 per cent in December despite Northern Ireland seeing a rise from 13.5 per cent to 16 per cent, according to the office for the Deputy Prime Minister. The highest rates remain in the North East (20.5 per cent), Yorkshire and the […]

Maximum security

I am a member of my employer’s pension scheme and will have completed 20 years’ service by retirement in August 2008. Do I need to make any arrangements to take into account the new legislation in 2006?

Qatar cover image - thumbnail

White paper — Qatar International Insights

Jelf Employee Benefits highlights new legislation, key requirements and policy considerations when structuring international private medical insurance (IPMI) for expatriate employees in Qatar. This edition will be of particular interest to global human resource directors, compensation and benefits specialists and mobility managers who have employee populations in Qatar.

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment