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POLES APART

10 QUESTIONS THAT DEMAND ANSWERS

1: What benefits can multi-ties, product ties, white labelling or dep-olarising stakeholder products bring to consumers which the current system fails to deliver?

2: How much will any change cost to implement, who will pay for this change and by what method?

3: What possible changes to stakeholder and Isas could be made to increase the efficiency of distri-bution without requir-ing changes to the polarisation regime?

4: What evidence is there to demonstrate a new regime will increase savings levels, especially for pensions?

5: What plans are there for a full public debate before any changes are made?

6: What research has been done to gauge public understanding of the current regime and how quickly they will understand the new set-up?

7: Will a change in the regime risk increasing the incidence of misselling and misbuying and, if so, by how much?

8: Who is ultimately responsible for the decision at the FSA and the Treasury?

9: Is this decision being taken purely on competition or economic grounds, as the London Economics&#39 report suggests, or is the consumer interest to be taken into account?

10: What damage will the options for change, that is, multi-ties, multi-product ties, gap-filling or white labelling, and depolarising Catmarked or kitemarked products do to the IFA sector over the next five to 10 years?

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