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Pavilion Asset Management – Socially Responsible Investment Fund

Wednesday, January 9, 2002.



Type: Oeic.

Aim: Growth by investing in 50-70 UK stocks.

Minimum investment: A shares £500, I shares £1m.

Investment split: 100 per cent in 50-70 UK stocks.

Yield: 1.9 per cent.

Isa link: Yes.

Pep transfers: Yes.

Charges: Initial A shares 5 per cent, annual A shares 1.5 per cent, I

shares 0.85 per cent.

Special offer: Initial charge on A shares reduced to 4 per cent.

Offer period: Until February 7, 2002.

Commission: Initial A shares 3 per cent, renewal A shares 0.5 per

cent.

Tel: 0845 6003693.

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