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Osborne urges Darling to clear up non-dom confusion

Conservative shadow chancellor George Osborne has urged Alistair Darling to clear up any confusion involving his plans to crackdown on non-doms as many residents are preparing to move abroad.

According to the Times Online, Darling was last night beginning to bow to pressures to backtrack on his controversial plans to introduce an annual £30,000 flat rate tax on non-domiciled residents living in the UK for at least seven years.

The proposals have been attacked by the City of London and Trade and Investment minister Lord Digby Jones warned last week the plans would see a mass exodus of wealth-creating individuals from Britain.

Osborne, who yesterday wrote to Darling urging him to abandon his plans in favour of Tory proposals, says: “Alistair Darling must clear up this confusion immediately as people are planning to move abroad as we speak.

“If these reports are true, I’m delighted once again that the Conservative Party is driving the government’s economic policy. But it does beg the question, why do we have this Chancellor of the Exchequer? The Chancellor is in full retreat in almost all areas at a time when we need strong and competent leadership in the face of uncertainty. We have a desperately weak Chancellor, who blames junior officials for his mistakes, and a dithering Prime Minister.”

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