View more on these topics

NU academy offers support for diploma

Norwich Union is setting up an academy aimed at helping financial advisers pass the Chartered Insurance Institute’s diploma in financial planning or equivalent.

NU says the academy, which launches in March, will help advisers move towards the standards and professionalism required by the retail distribution review.

The academy will be free to advisers but those who want to take part must be members of a professional body.

It will provide learning support through NU’s team of trainers and regional consultants as well as online material.

Director of distribution development Stephen Gay says the academy offers IFAs a blended package of support.

He says: “This means that we have taken into consideration the range of learning styles that people have and the way that they may want to interact.

“Part of it is about online remote self-study and, subject to availability, there will be a face-to-face opportunity as well for study seminars for those who are preparing for exams.

“We are doing this very much in association with the Personal Finance Society with which we have been talking for a number of months, so our training material is aligned with CII material.”

Informed Choice director Martin Bamford says he has conflicting thoughts over the programme.

He says: “My personal view is that anything that is closely tied to a provider does in some way compromise independence but I think that advisers are going to need all the help they can get to achieve these qualifications.”

Recommended

£6M consultant fees on personal accounts

The Government has revealed it has already spent over £6m on fees for consultants to advise on pension personal accounts.In a written answer this week, pensions minister Mike O’Brien said the Department for Work and Pensions has spent £6,604,522 on consultancy advice up to the end of October 2007.Scottish Life head of pensions strategy Steve […]

ScotEq and Widows join property fund clampdown

Aegon Scottish Equitable and Scottish Widows have closed the door on their UK commercial property funds to prevent an exodus of investors.The firms join Friends Provident which imposed a six-month notice period on its £1.2bn fund in December.Aegon has introduced a deferred period of up to 12 months on its Scottish Equitable fund which applies […]

A shaw thing

Sam Shaw is a reporter on Money MarketingHaving just about persuaded Sumus chairman Paul Bradshaw not to pimp me as the wife-to-be of a certain mutual friend of ours (I think…), I wound up whisky-ing into the early hours of Saturday morning following the Falcon conference, with my partners in booze being none other than […]

Fipp can flip pension income options

Hornbuckle Mitchell is offering a drawdown product which allows retirees to move into a scheme pension.The flexible income pension plan gives investors the ability to switch to more suitable options as their circumstances change.The Fipp is structured to allow a combination of tax-free cash withdrawal and income drawdown as well as the ability to move […]

Japan Economic Insight

James Dowey, Chief Economist, and Paul Caruana-Galizia, Economist

The conventional wisdom is that following a roughly 50 per cent rise in the stock market in 2013 in Yen terms, the Japan trade is over and done*. So the story goes, those big gains were due to a one-off boost from quantitative easing (QE) and a depreciation of the Yen — policies that one should think of as a palliative to Japan’s economic weakness, but not a cure. Rather the cure, and by implication the necessary condition for a longer-term investment case, is deep structural reforms — a painstaking re-weaving of Japan’s economic and social fabric, no less. The story continues: this is a much tougher test than launching a blast of QE, and one that prime minister Shinzo Abe, although well intentioned and well supported by the public thus far, is likely to fail. Stick a fork in Japan, it’s done…continue reading

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment