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No party can claim control of stock market

No political party can claim the stock market has performed best whilst under their control, according to research from Halifax Financial Services.
Halifax measured the performance of the FT30 index during the three months before and after each of the 10 elections since 1966, as well as the performance of the stock market during the Governments actual term in office.
The research found both Labour and Conservatives have seen rises during their particular term in office.
The highest level of growth in the stock market in real terms was during the Conservative 1983 to 1987 term in office, with a growth of 123 per cent. The next highest real terms increase was during the 1974 to 1979 Labour Government with a 90 per cent rise.
Halifax chief economist Martin Ellis says: “Although wider economic conditions clearly play a part in the rise and fall of the stock market, election campaigns do appear to have a marked impact on share prices.”

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In Focus — February 2015

Jelf Employee Benefits looks at the issue of paying anaesthetist fees when the patient had no chance to discuss or agree to them prior to care; and provides recommendations for avoiding this scenario.

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