View more on these topics

Nikkei falls 6 per cent after earthquake

Japanese shares have fallen by over 6 per cent on the first full trading day since the earthquake and tsunami hit the country.

The Nikkei 225 closed on 9,620.49, a fall of 6.18 per cent. The Bank of Japan has injected £114bn into the banking system to stabilise markets.

Over 10,000 people are feared dead after an earthquake measuring 8.9 on the Richter scale struck the North-East of Japan, triggering the tsunami, just before the close of trading in Tokyo on Friday.

The FTSE was steady on opening this morning. At 9.31am the blue-chip index stood at 5824.65.

Recommended

3

Aviva reports highlights debt concerns for over 55s

One in five people over 55 still need to repay their mortgages and owe an average of over £65,000 according to Aviva. The company says the findings of its Real Retirement Report are a worrying sign of the impact of the economic climate on today’s older generation. In a consultation paper published last June, the […]

Transact offers access to Analytics

Financial Express and Transact have launched a facility that enables advisers to transfer portfolio data from Transact into Financial Express Analytics. The firms say the link will give advisers instant access to Analytics tools, without having to enter any data. Analytics allows advisers access to factsheets for funds, managers, sectors and portfolios as well as […]

14

FSA warns life insurance industry faces long-term squeeze

The life insurance industry faces a squeeze on profits because people are not buying enough long-term savings products. In its prudential risk outlook, published today, the Financial Services Authority says the sector was collectively profitable in 2009 but that legislative and regulatory pressures will also hit the industry. The report says: “UK life insurers face […]

Retirement - thumbnail

Pension freedoms: stop the scams

At the beginning of 2015, we highlighted that the new pension freedoms that come fully online on 6 April also represent a very attractive opportunity for the criminal fraternity to scam savers out of some, or all, of their accumulated retirement savings.

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment