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New Star – High Income Fund

January 23, 2002

Type: Oeic.

Aim: Income and growth by investing in UK ordinary shares, fixed
interest securities, preference shares, convertibles.

Minimum investment: Lump sum £1,000, monthly £50.

Investment split: 100 per cent invested in UK ordinary shares, fixed
interest securities, preference shares, convertibles.

Yield: 4 per cent gross a year.

Isa link: Yes.

Pep transfers: Yes.

Charges: Initial 5.25 per cent, annual 1.5 per cent.

Special offer: Initial charge reduced to 4.25 per cent.

Offer period: Until April 5, 2002.

Commission: Initial 3 per cent, renewal 0.5 per cent.

Tel: 020 7225 9200.

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