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Nationwide – Nationwide High Income Fund

Friday, 26 October 2001.

Type: Unit trust.

Aim: Income by investing in UK corporate bonds, overseas equities and fixed interest securities.

Minimum investment: Lump sum £500, monthly £50.

Investment split: UK corporate bonds 97 per cent, overseas equities 2 per cent, fixed interest securities 1 per cent.

Yield: 6.5 per cent.

Isa link: Yes.

Pep transfers: No.

Charges: Annual 1 per cent.

Commission: None.

Tel: 01793 655195.


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