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Nationwide Building Society – 25 Year Fixed Rate Mortgage

Nationwide Building Society

25 Year Fixed Rate Mortgage

Type: Flexible fixed rate mortgage

Fixed term: 25 years

Fixed rate: Up to 95% of valuation -6.38%, up to 90% of valuation – 5.98%
Minimum loan: £1

Maximum loan: Up to 95% of valuation subject to a maximum of £200,000, up to 90% of valuation subject to a maximum of £500,000, up to 85% of valuation subject to a maximum of £1m, loans above £1m negotiable

Income multiples: Based on affordability

Conditions: Not available for remortgages

Flexible features: Overpayments up to £500 a month, underpayments, payment holidays, lump sum withdrawals, interest calculated daily

Arrangement fee: £599

Redemption fee: 3% of mortgage balance in first 10 years

Introducer’s fee: Subject to negotiation

Tel: 0800 302010

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