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Meteor Asset Management – Geared Growth Plan

Meteor Asset Management – Geared Growth Plan

Type: Capital-protected bond

Aim: Growth linked to the performance of the FTSE 100 index

Minimum-maximum investment: £10,00-no maximum, Isa £7,200, £10,200 for the over 50s

Term: Five years and two weeks

Return: 30% of the original investment at the end of year three provided the index is at least 30% above its initial value, otherwise five times the growth in the index capped at 50% of the original investment

Guarantee; Original capital returned in full at the end of the term provided the index does not fall by more than 50% by the final day of the term

Closing date: January 13. 2010, January 6, 2010 for Isa transfers

Commission: Initial 3%

Tel: 020 7904 1010

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