View more on these topics

MEP plea for pay rise for Euro regulators

The remuneration package for heads of the European supervisory authorities must improve to give them the political clout to do their jobs effectively, says MEP Peter Skinner.

The regulation of financial services across Europe is overseen by three ESAs – the European Securities and Markets Agency, the European Banking Agency and the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority.

They aim to improve coordination between national supervisory authorities such as the FSA and raise standards of national supervision across the EU.

Speaking to Money Marketing, Labour MEP for the South-east Skinner said the authorities’ chairs are currently graded below those they may negotiate with in terms of pay, which could cause problems.

He says: “We have to go back and look at salaries and pay grades. They are currently lower than commissioner level. If they want to face off the head of the European Central Bank, Jean-Claude Trichet, he can look at them and say, on pay grade terms, they cannot ask him to do things.”

Last week the economic and monetary affairs Committee briefly postponed its backing of the heads of the three ESAs.

It said there were too few applications because of uncompetitive pay packages and it had concerns over budgetary pressure affecting the ability of the supervisors to “hit the ground running”.

Skinner says: “The current supervisors are perfectly competent and effective but there has to be an attractive offer to get the very best to rise to the top.”

Recommended

5

Shadow MPC would raise rates in February

The Shadow Monetary Policy Committee has ruled by a majority of five to four in favour of raising the bank rate to 1 per cent on February 10. At the quarterly gathering of independent economists, the five members who voted in favour of the rate rise outlined three major causes for concern that led to […]

Keith-Webb.jpg

Take the RDR initiative

During the last 12 months, a number of organisations, have announced their intention to leave part or all of the retail market. This has led to a certain amount of consolidation and move-ment within the market. The fear and challenge that consumers, particularly in the mass market, will not pay for advice has become ever […]

Keep power in reserve for a crisis

The Government is being urged to have a reserve power it can use to intervene if it thinks regulators are failing to act in the face of a crisis. The Treasury’s consultation paper on the regulatory changes, published in July, says when emerging risks become a crisis the Government would have overall responsibility for decisions […]

Global cause

While many managers talk of rising shareholder distributions in the US, Europe or even in China, they are not the only sources of growing dividends. In fact, some of the high- yielding countries are rarely mentioned, namely places such as Australia, Canada and Brazil. The highest country allocations in the £811m M&G global dividend fund, […]

The Perils of Passive Investing

The era of loose monetary policy created an environment that rewarded passive investors in the US. However, with the US raising interest rates for the first time since 2006, Felix Wintle explains why he believes active investing will be more important than ever. In the video Felix discusses: The rising cost of capital and its […]

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

There are 3 comments at the moment, we would love to hear your opinion too.

  1. I think the point the MEP should be making is that these people should be at the same pay grade.That doesn’t necessarily mean that the ESA heads should get a raise…

  2. From the mess they’ve made of it so far, I wouldn’t pay them in brass washers!

    Political clout doesn’t come from pay rises, it stems from powerful and persuasive argument and convincing people that you are right.

  3. Michael Fallas 8th March 2011 at 4:11 pm

    Mr Skinner clearly believes pay can only go up and has failed to look to see if others he is using to justify a need for pay rises are “paid too much”.

    Maybe Mr Skinner would care to declare his pay and perks package so we can compare that also?

Leave a comment