View more on these topics

Keeping it simple now could make it complicated later


Peter Smith is 100 per cent correct. In an ideal world, a short key features illus-tration and document, with an accom-panying letter of recommendation, should be all that is needed.

In most cases it is probably is all that is really needed, if we are reasonable.

The problem is when things go wrong (whether that be the fault of the adviser, the provider or the client making spurious claims). Therefore, we find ourselves in the position where clients are faced with stacks of paper that remains unread, unless there is a problem later on.

Keeping it simple for the client could make it very complicated for the adviser at a future date.

Christopher Lean



Solicitors take twice as long over property sales

Conveyancing solicitors are taking longer to finalise the legal work on property sales, delaying the process by up to five months, says Lentune Mortgages director Stuart Gregory. He says the time taken by some firms to complete the required legal work after an offer has been produced has as much as doubled. He says: “Usually, […]

Bolton’s China trust reports “disappointing” results

The half year results for Anthony Bolton’s Fidelity China Special Situations investment trust make for “disappointing reading”, according to John Owen, chairman at Fidelity. The investment trust has underperformed its MSCI China index benchmark, as net asset value dropped 28.9 per cent. Owen says: “The board acknowledges that the results for the six month period […]


Promising start but big money tests still to come

Eighteen months after coming to power, we thought it was a good time to take a look at what the coalition Government has so far achieved in the pensions arena. In this supplement, leading IFAs, providers, MPs, campaigners and unions give their verdict on the current administration’s avalanche of papers, proposals, rules and ideas. LibDem […]

Performance gap wider in cautious managed than global equities

The gap between the best and worst-performing funds is wider in the cautious managed sector than in global equities, according to Thames River. Multi-manager Gary Potter analysed Lipper data for 165 cautious managed funds and 229 global funds from October 1, 2007 to November 11. He found the difference in performance between the best and […]


News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up


There is one comment at the moment, we would love to hear your opinion too.

  1. I recall that many of the ‘mis-sold’ pension transfers were found in favour of clients not because the client had been given bad advice but because the adviser didn’t have sufficient documentary evidence that they had given good advice.

    And now the FSA wants wants us to simplify things – dont they realise that everything we produce is about covering our backsides rather than providing the client with useful information!

Leave a comment