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Just Retirement to float on AIM to raise £50m

Just Retirement has announced its intention to float on the Alternative Investment Market to raise £50m.

The equity release and annuities specialist, formed in 2004, plans to use that money to further expand the business.

The company reported total sales of £297.9m in the year to June 30, 2006.

Chief executive Mike Fuller says: “The market for financial solutions for people at and in retirement is large and is forecast to grow rapidly. We believe there is a real need to offer tailored products that are adapted to reflect individual circumstances and requirements.

“We focus on providing high quality products and services to address this demand. I look forward to continuing to lead the company as we grow and develop the business further.”

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