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Wells Street Journal: Step forward the regulator for lying politicians; Is Damian Green a biscuit?

Politicians’ ability to produce bare-faced lies were exposed before, during and after the EU referendum campaign.

Few were surprised find promises slipping away even as the outcome became obvious early the next morning.

But a group of freedom fighters – clearly drawn from the ranks of financial services professionals – are fighting back.

A petition created earlier this month wants MPs to be held to the same standard the FCA expects of advisers. If successful, politicians will be held accountable for being “clear, fair and not misleading”.

The petition notice says it is in response to the “misrepresentations, mistruths and lies” the electorate were fed by politicians in the EU referendum, including that £350m sent to the EU each week would be redirected to the NHS.

Sadly, only 45 people have so far signed the petition meaning it falls short of the 10,000 signatures required for the government to respond to it and a long way off the 100,000 signatures needed for it to be considered for a debate in parliament.

The WSJ urges you to sign up here, the fightback is on.

Introducing Damian Green MP: Half man, half biscuit

The past week has been a whirlwind of political appointments, MP backstabbing and some scandal thrown in for good measure.

Those trying to keep up with all the comings and going might not have had time to research the new work and pensions secretary. Fear not, WSJ is here to help.

When Stephen Crabb quit the post after a mere four mouths and one sexting scandal, all eyes turned to who would replace him. A man of integrity, grit and new ideas, hopefully.

Enter stage left Damian Green. His Twitter provides all we need to know. He’s an MP for Ashford, a Reading FC fan and is “Half Man Half Biscuit”.

The only question remains, what kind of minister will he be? Will he be nice, learn to hobnob with the right people and speak to the (custard) cream of the industry? Or will he crumble and (brandy) snap under the pressure?

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Comments

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  1. Unfortunately, this article exposes the obvious problem of trying to regulate ‘lying’ politicians – the obvious political bias in enforcement. Afterall, this article refers to the perfectly valid point that EU contributions might be better spent on domestic priorities as a “lie”. It omits the simple fact that the main lies were told by the ‘remain’ camp: whether it was the ‘predictions’ of economic Armageddon or indeed the claim by George Osborne that he would meet the ‘shock’ of a Leave Vote with a fiscal tightening (‘punishment budget’) and indeed a monetary tightening e.g. the claim that interest & mortgage rates would have to rise. Instead we have the opposite: policymakers at the BoE still deciding whether the economy has suffered a shock, and contemplating rate cuts if they decide there has been; Politicians talking about cuts in corporation tax to make the UK more competitive and so forth. Clearly, the lies of the remain camp were very powerful. They co-opted millions of people with no love of the EU to vote in its favour on false pretences.

    And yet you are silent. What next? Arresting journalists who tell lies that offend some section of metropolitan opinion? Shame on Money Marketing.

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