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Hutton recommends career average pensions for public sector

Lord John Hutton has recommended pensions for public sector workers shift from final salary to career average provision before the end of this Parliament.

In the final report of the Independent Public Service Pensions Commission, published today, the former Labour minister sets out detailed structural reforms designed to make public sector schemes “sustainable and affordable”.

He resists calls to introduce a hybrid scheme with a salary cap “due to the complexity this introduces to the system”, instead suggesting Government implements tiered contribution rates to reflect the “different characteristics” of higher earners.

Other key recommendations include linking the normal pension age in most public sector schemes to the state pension age, setting a “clear cost ceiling” for public provision to limit taxpayers’ exposure to employees’ pensions and introducing stronger, independent governance regimes across public service pensions.The pension age for uniformed services employees – which includes the armed forces, police and firefighters – will be 60.

The report says the cost ceiling, which has not been specified, should be the proportion of pay that Government will contribute. If it is breached, a consultation would be issued to bring costs back below the ceiling. However, if the consultation ended in deadlock Hutton says there should be a default mechanism which could take the form of an increase in employee contributions or a decrease in accrual rates.

The commission says accrued rights should be protected, meaning the final salary link for past service for current members would be maintained. It also proposes an overhaul of the legal framework for public service pensions to make it simpler.

Hutton (pictured) says: “These proposals strike a balanced deal between public service workers and the taxpayer. Pensions based on career average earnings will be fairer to the majority of members that do not have the high salary growth rewarded in final salary schemes.

“The current model of public service pension provision is clearly not tenable in the long-term. There is a clear need for reform. Getting the decisions right on the most appropriate structures and designs will be crucial to making any changes work in the future. This will only be achievable if there is effective dialogue between public service employers, employees and unions.”

The commission has not recommended specific levels for accrual rates, indexation and employee contributions as these remain “a matter for Government”. However, Hutton does warn that setting contribution rates too high would risk low-earners opting out of the scheme.

The report also recommends that benefits are increased in line with average earnings during the accrual phase for active scheme members. Post-retirement benefits should then be linked to prices to ensure they maintain their purchasing power.

The Treasury is currently in discussions with representatives from the Trades Union Congress over how a 3 per cent increase public sector pensions contributions will be phased in from 2012.

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Comments

There are 4 comments at the moment, we would love to hear your opinion too.

  1. Our trusty local sleuths (the local police force) are ahead of the game. The number of last minute ‘promotions’ according to their last accounts doubled, and as far as I can see for no operational reasons. Couldn’t be anything to do with getting their ‘final salaries’ up before the game is up could it?

  2. Surely if NEST is good enough for the wider population then it should be good enough for the Public Sector or am I missing something?DC rather than DB with full portability actually means that job changers are protected and can fairly take their pension rights with them throughout their careers. OIMHO of course!

  3. Level down to the lowest with no protection for the lowest paid. The UK is building in a deeper social and economic divide.
    Pensions all around are under attack it is making me wonder if advising people to start one now is really the right way ahead?

  4. I had to scoff at hearing a spokesman for public sector workers describing this change as unjust on the grounds that public sector pay scales are significantly poorer than those in the private sector, which is compensated for by “slightly” better pension provision. Conveniently omitted from this statement was the fact that most public sector workers have no idea whatsoever just how cushy their jobs really are by comparison with those of their counterparts in the private sector. A couple of months in the private sector and most of them would either be out on their ear or keeling over from stress.

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