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FSSC chief exec resigns- Simon Ellis to head review

The Financial Services Skills Council has announced the resignation of chief executive Teresa Sayers and the appointment of Simon Ellis to lead an independent review of its future strategy.

Sayers has been at the FSSC and its previous body for nearly ten years and will leave in September.

The review is to take place between July and September 2009 with Ellis – who takes on the role of managing director – and his team speaking with employers, professional and awarding bodies and trade associations. The discussions will cover the future role of the FSSC.

The FSSC was denied a new licence by the Government in May , with Skills Secretary John Denham saying the body “did not meet the standard required”. The Government ordered it to review its strategy and will make a decision on the position of the FSSC’s licence in the Autumn after the review takes place.

Sayers says: “This seems to me to be the right time to pass on the baton and I am confident that the FSSC will continue to play a leading role in promoting standards and raising skills levels across the UK.”

The Council says it is liaising with the UK Commission for Employment and Skills on its relicensing requirements, and will use these insights to inform its proposals on how the organisation can evolve.

In line with UKCES recommendations, the FSSC has also appointed a strategy consultancy to work with Ellis on the review.

FSSC chairman Roy Leighton says: “We share the Government’s view that, now more than ever, employers must be given the support they need to invest in skills and prepare for the upturn. In response, a committee of the Board of the FSSC has resolved to conduct this thorough and inclusive review of the Council’s future strategy, which will help us achieve a better outcome for consumers, professional bodies and the firms of all sizes who are at the heart of our business. We are delighted that Simon, with his proven abilities and experience, is joining us to drive this review through to firm recommendations for the future, with the fullest industry involvement.”

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Comments

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  1. No IFAs required
    Many years ago I offered some input and was cast aside like something the cat had dragged in, the arrogance of all the ‘regulators’ is what damages their own institutions.

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