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Labour election win could block cash for annuity plan

Pensioners who want to swap their annuities for cash or drawdown under the Coalition’s plan could find a Labour government blocking their plans, Money Marketing understands. Chancellor George Osborne launched a consultation on creating a secondary annuity market as part of his March Budget, and claimed the reform would allow around five million people to […]

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In the crosshairs: Politicians and regulators take aim at non-advised business

Non-advised business models will be in the crosshairs of politicians and regulators no matter the outcome of this week’s general election, Money Marketing understands. Ros Altmann – who is to be made a Conservative peer and appointed minister for consumer protection if the Tories form a Government – says she will explore banning commission entirely. […]

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Apfa: Adviser profits up 5% as market stabilises

Advice firms saw an increase in pre-tax profits of 5 per cent last year as the market began to stabilise, according to Apfa’s latest state of the market report. The annual report shows that pre-tax profit for all firms with an FCA primary category ‘financial adviser’ was £931m last year, up from £884m in 2013. […]

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Advisers cheer Conservative victory

Advisers have welcomed news of the Conservatives’ election victory despite mourning the loss of some Liberal Democrat ministers. David Cameron’s party have been swept back into power today, gathering enough seats to rule without the support of the Lib Dems. Alpha Investments and Financial Planning director Alan Solomons says the news is positive for investment markets. […]

Japan Economic Insight

James Dowey, Chief Economist, and Paul Caruana-Galizia, Economist

The conventional wisdom is that following a roughly 50 per cent rise in the stock market in 2013 in Yen terms, the Japan trade is over and done*. So the story goes, those big gains were due to a one-off boost from quantitative easing (QE) and a depreciation of the Yen — policies that one should think of as a palliative to Japan’s economic weakness, but not a cure. Rather the cure, and by implication the necessary condition for a longer-term investment case, is deep structural reforms — a painstaking re-weaving of Japan’s economic and social fabric, no less. The story continues: this is a much tougher test than launching a blast of QE, and one that prime minister Shinzo Abe, although well intentioned and well supported by the public thus far, is likely to fail. Stick a fork in Japan, it’s done…continue reading

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