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Eurozone agrees new bailout fund details

Eurozone officials have agreed on the new structure of the financial bailout fund to protect the area from its worsening debt crisis.

This week, fears were raised that Portugal could have to seek financial support from the international community after it failed to pass new austerity measures and its prime minister, José Sócrates, resigned.

At a meeting of the European Council yesterday, heads of state decided to replace the temporary European Financial Stability Facility with the European Stability Mechanism, subject to national approval.

The summit also established the operational details of the ESM, confirming that it will have £436.8 billion at its disposal and hold a AAA rating. The EFSF, meanwhile, will be granted an effective lending capacity of £387 billion to be in place by June.

In addition, delegates resolved to adopt the Euro Plus Pact, which will allow members to undertake economic cooperation beyond their existing commitments and arrangements.

It will also be open to non-eurozone countries and will see Denmark, Poland, Latvia, Lithuania, Bulgaria and Romania join.

Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the EC, says previous meetings of eurozone leaders, especially the informal gathering on March 11, helped to lay down much of the groundwork for the new measures.

“Today almost all the strands of this enterprise have come together,” he says.


The Isa silly season

Isas are available throughout the year but many investors leave it to the last moment. So this week I thought I would give some thought to the so-called Isa season, particularly at a time of stockmarket volatility caused by geopolitical problems in Libya, continuing debt problems in Europe and the tragedy of the Japanese earthquake. […]

Fears EU lenders will flout MMR

The Association of Mortgage Intermed- iaries is warning that European lenders may passport into the UK under the EU’s responsible lending and borrowing directive and avoid the FSA’s mortgage market review if it is too demanding. AMI director Robert Sinclair says it is vital that the FSA takes the directive, due to be published later […]

Osborne to clampdown on Efrbs

George Osborne will look to tighten the rules governing Employer Financed Retirement Benefit Schemes in Wednesday’s Budget, The Sunday Times reports. The Chancellor (pictured) will say the offshore pension trusts, known as Efrbs, are a form of “disguised remuneration”, the paper says. The schemes allow companies to claim a corporation tax deduction for employer pension […]

Value remains within European equities

By Rob Burnett, Neptune European Opportunities Fund

In recent months, investors have become more pessimistic about both the European and the US economic outlook and yet stockmarkets have pushed on to new highs. Some would argue that this is a worrying divergence. We would take the opposite view. This appears to be classic bull market behaviour. A wall of worry has been rebuilt, and stockmarket resilience should be taken as a sign of strength. The market is discounting an improving economic outlook ahead, particularly in the south of Europe.


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