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Credit Suisse Asset Management – Trans-Adventure Isa

Friday, 9th February 2001.



Type: Oeic maxi Isa.

Aim: Growth by investing in global post venture capital fund and transatlantic fund.

Minimum investment: Lump sum £3,000.

Maximum investment: £7,000.

Catmarked: No.

Investment choice: Global post venture capital fund 50 per cent, transatlantic fund 50 per cent.

Charges: Initial 5.25 per cent, annual 1.5 per cent.

Commission: Initial 3 per cent, renewal 0.5 per cent.

Tel: 020 7426 2626.

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