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Correspondent&#39s Week

Saturday. Rang Jo, who looks after my horse, to see if I am still welcome on her yard since my defection from the Tory Party. She thanked me for my concern and assured me that she has spoken to the local hunt and, no, there is no reason to move my horse from the yard. Perhaps I would like to go for a hack on Sunday?

Today&#39s question: do I answer my closest friend&#39s unbelievably cruel letter about my defection and try to rescue that friendship? Or do I accept that someone who is prepared to end a friendship just because of a move from one political party to another was never a friend? Before you answer that, I should tell you that he works for the Daily Mail.

Spent Saturday evening at dinner with a bunch of queens who were guests of a friend of mine, Robert, in his fantastic house, set in parkland. Some of them turned out to be Tories and, having never really warmed to “the Mary with the ear of their leader”, seemed to find relief in their now tangible instrument of criticism.

Sunday. Rode Jake, my horse. It rained. Ian, Jo&#39s husband, stopped clipping his sheep&#39s feet to ask whether Labour would now go easy on hunting. Surely, he reasoned, if section 28 defines the Tories&#39 unwillingness to be inclusive, hunting demonstrated the Labour Party&#39s unwillingness to do the same. It seems that I am out of the frying pan and into the fire.

Got drunk and went to the local Centre Parcs with my neighbour, who works there, and spent hours trying to slide into people I fancied on the water shoots. I sometimes wonder whether heterosexual men actually know when they are the subject of gratuitous ogling from other blokes.

Monday. Met with Channel 4 to discuss European guide. It involves Freddie (the spaniel) and me travelling around Europe in a camper van. They think it&#39s a crap idea so it looks as if I will never get on the telly.

Afternoon spent productively resolving local resident issues at the Institute of Contemporary Arts before dinner with the chairman of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra to discuss branding. If any of you bored financial wizards fancy getting involved in something worthwhile (big intellectual jump there for people in our industry), they are looking for a chief exec and people to get involved.

Do I sound bitter? Any-way, the film was like sitting through a 90 minute advertisement for toys.

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