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Close Fund Management first with FTSE4Good fund

Close Fund Management is launching the first fund tracking the new FTSE4Good index of the top 100 socially responsible UK companies. A proportion of the management charge of the new FTSE4Good UK Fund, rising from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of the charges as the fund gets larger, will be donated to Unicef. The annual management charge is 1 per cent.

Close Fund Management managing director Marc Gordon says: “Investors, as consumers, are worried about the world they live in – congestion, climate changes, food scares. More importantly, they realise that companies that address these challenges are likely to be well managed, reap future rewards and avoid risk.”

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Fragile future

There is danger lurking on the horizon for fund management as EU finance ministers discuss the future of collective investment. In advance of the new Ucits (undertakings for collective investment in transferable securities) agreement, which could be reached next month – and amid low general industry awareness – what is the current state of play? […]

Chase Fleming Asset Management cuts charges

Chase Fleming Asset Management is cutting the initial charge on lump sum investments into three of its funds.Lump sum investments of £5,000 or more into the Save & Prosper Premier Equity Growth Fund, the S&P European Growth Fund and the Fleming UK Dynamic Fund will receive a 2 per cent discount on the initial charge […]

Cousins tells FSA to act on endowment surrenders

Labour MP Jim Cousins has slammed the FSA for failing to ensure that life offices provide endowment policyholders with all the available options when they are looking to surrender their policy. Cousins has written to FSA chairman Howard Davies demanding that he take action to prevent policyholders being kept in the dark any longer over […]

Edinburgh Java Trust announces year end results

Edinburgh Java Trust&#39s net asset value fell by 53 per cent in 2000 from 13.5p to 6.34p per share. The fall compares with a fall of 51.6 per cent in the Jakarta Composite Indonesian Index, which reflects a 38.5 per cent decline in the Indonesian stockmarket and a 21.4 per cent depreciation in the Indonesian […]

Japan Economic Insight

James Dowey, Chief Economist, and Paul Caruana-Galizia, Economist

The conventional wisdom is that following a roughly 50 per cent rise in the stock market in 2013 in Yen terms, the Japan trade is over and done*. So the story goes, those big gains were due to a one-off boost from quantitative easing (QE) and a depreciation of the Yen — policies that one should think of as a palliative to Japan’s economic weakness, but not a cure. Rather the cure, and by implication the necessary condition for a longer-term investment case, is deep structural reforms — a painstaking re-weaving of Japan’s economic and social fabric, no less. The story continues: this is a much tougher test than launching a blast of QE, and one that prime minister Shinzo Abe, although well intentioned and well supported by the public thus far, is likely to fail. Stick a fork in Japan, it’s done…continue reading

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