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Cheltenham & Gloucester increase interest rates on its Isas


Cheltenham & Gloucester has increased the interest rates on its Cash and Tessa only Isas.


The move sees the interest rate increase by 0.75 per cent to 6.25 per cent from 5.5 per cent.


The rate change applies from May 8. It is guaranteed to be the same as the banks base rate until January 1, 2000.

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