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Brunel Franklin resigns from Claims Standards Council

Claims management company Brunel Franklin has resigned from the trade body the Claims Standards Council as it develops a claims firms code of practice.

The claims firm says it will not be renewing its annual membership for the CSC, which represents the claims management industry.

Brunel Franklin is currently working with other claims firms on an industry initiative to be launched soon which will look to encourage best practice within the sector.

Brunel Franklin managing director Sally Bowyer says: “For some time we have been working in partnership with a select group of respected and professional financial claims management companies to put together a voluntary code of practice.We will be making an announcement shortly about a new initiative that actively encourages best practice for professional financial claims management companies.

“Brunel Franklin and its like-minded partners remain totally committed to best practice and to promoting the highest level of ethics and professional conduct in the industry.”

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  1. Although I don’t rate them at all I can’t blame them.

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