View more on these topics

Broadband problem brings halt to business

As the daily post dwindles and more business is done online, I have, like a good many I suspect, embraced technology.

Living and working in a rural area, I was delighted when BT announced that broadband would be available in the village. No more waiting what seemed like hours for a Mortgage Brain download to complete or spending half a day inputting an online application.

Just over two weeks ago, for no apparent reason, I became unable to connect with email or the net. “Must be computer problem,” I thought but all the checks could not find a problem, so I called my internet service provider.

“We will check out your service,” I was told but this also failed to find a fault. In this case, they had to order a line check from BT. This took at least 48 hours. Again, there was no apparent fault so an in-depth line check was needed.

I was told that someone would call within three working days. I waited three days for nothing to happen and so, finally, in desperation, begged my service provider to call BT and get them to arrange an appointment.

“We will be with you on Wednesday,” I was told. Another three days passed and the man from BT turned up. He conducted a line test and concluded that I worked too far away from the exchange and the line was not capable of carrying the speed of connection I had got.

I was told they could solve the problem by slowing my connection down. The earliest this could be done was in five working days. I waited with bated breath.

There were, of course, solutions.

What I would urge any- one to do is look at the terms of service for their internet provider.

In my case, and I guess many more, the service provider cannot be held responsible in any way for loss of service or busin- ess and dealing with BT through a third party requires persistence that would shame a marathon runner.

After two weeks of being out of communication, there is still no sign of a solution while I sit in a state of isolation, not knowing when I can get back to proper work.

Doing everything electronically is fine but you do lose the means to do even some basic tasks when the system fails.

Recommended

Stroud & Swindon ceo John Parker to resign by end of the year

Stroud & Swindon chief executive John Parker plans to retire by the end of the year.Parker will take planned retirement from December 31.Plans are for current finance director David Hill to succeed him.Parker, who has been the society’s ceo for the past 13 years has also been the chairman of the BSA for the past […]

Plum launches new software

Plum Software has launched new IFA software with features including extended branching and priorities capabilities.Plum says IFA firms can now tailor database access according to identities and logo with the software also helping to manage and monitor compliance and co-ordinate marketing across different offices.It says the priorities option allows firms to set up their own […]

ScotEq Intl pushes Poat out for IFAs

Scottish Equitable International has introduced a calculator for IFAs to work out clients’ pre- owned assets tax. For each bond value, the table summarises the annual tax benefit, the number of days before exceeding the 5,000 limit and the date by which the settlor needs to be removed as beneficiary to remain within this limit.

Credit Suisse unveils Incubator fund

Credit Suisse has announced details of its multi-manager Incubator fund to launch on July 25.It will aim to take significant stakes in funds less than 100m in size, hoping to capitalise on early growth.The fund will be managed by Gary Potter and Robert Burdett and be capped at 75m. It will invest in three main […]

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment