View more on these topics

Boutiques are in style fashion

The trend of big-name managers jumping ship to join either a small


investment house or to start their own firms is is now firmly established


in the UK.


The phenomenon of boutiques began in the US about 10 years ago and


boutiques now springing up in the UK.


In the last couple of years, Japan specialist Ed Merner left Schroder to


join Atlantis, William Pattison left Fleming for LionTrust, Scottish Widows


fund manager Albert Morillo joined BlackRock and former Perpetual fund


manager Scott McGlashan is setting up his own Far East ern boutique.


Poor pension fund performance in recent years by some of the traditional


big names, such as PDFM and Schroder, has given new smaller play ers the


opportunity to capture mandates.


The big houses had the balanced pension market all sewn up a few years ago


but a period of sustained underperformance has seen a change in trustees&#39


perception and they have turned to specialist players.


Some of the smaller houses are already making an impact.


In January, league tables from the Combined Actuarial Performance Service


showed smaller investment companies outpaced the bigger players in the


pooled pension market last year.


The star was Orbitex Investments&#39 £1m exempt balanced fund which soared by


154 per cent. It comfortably beat second-placed Fuji-Lord Abb ett&#39s fund


which returned 75.8 per cent.


Boutique Bonfield Asset Management was set up in 1997. It has $100m under


management split between two funds investing in Central Europe and Japan.


It is planning to launch a Japan Oeic fund in the summer to be managed by


ex-Schroder fund manager James Salter.


It is also planning a Japan hedge fund and is looking to recruit fund


management teams to extend its Japanese and European capabilities.


Head of global marketing Paul Boughton, who joined Bonfield from Schroder


last month, uses the word “nimble” to describe the way boutiques operate


and why many people are keen to move away from the big houses.


He says: “We will aim to keep our funds relatively small because we want


to provide a unique offering and performance. We do not want to be me-too.”


Bonfield, like many boutiques, is not looking for a retail presence and


has no inten tion of becoming a Jupiter or a Newton. It will target the top


end of the market and discretionary players such as the Lazards and the


Hendersons. It does not have “hot money” going in and out all the time and


wants to build up a high-quality client base.


Boughton says: “A bout ique business is very much a performance-driven


busi ness and we are the owners of the business so we have an added


incentive to produce the performance.”


He believes boutiques can add value to the customer by giving them a more


personal service than they would get from a big house. He and the fund


managers often ring clients to keep them up to date on the fund.


Boughton says: “Last week, James made an important call on a particular


high-profile stock. We called clients to explain why he had made that call.


But we can only make such calls when we are legally able to do so.”


Fund managers who have made their name are moving to the smaller start-ups


because they want to manage money – and that is all.


In the world of the big organisation, office protocol, internal politics


and red tape can often interfere and this is driving managers away. Many


are getting frustrated and they want flexibility.


Matrix Money Management product development director Bridget Cleverly


says: “Consolidation in the industry has meant that companies are getting


so big that managers are losing their freedom. Managers in big


organisations are spending more time on onerous tasks such as client


servicing and internal meetings when they want to concentrate on managing


money.”


The fund management industry is set to divide into the big players and the


small niche players and those caught in the middle could well suffer.


Boughton says: “It is difficult to be unique in the mid-range. The smaller


players have no choice but to deliver performance if they want to survive


and by doing that they will get a high-quality client base.”

Recommended

A cooler summer is the hot forecast

Do you think Catmarked mortgages will enjoy high sales?SK: The way the qualification criteria have been drafted,I think it ishighly unlikely that Catmarked mortgages will sell in any volume.There is little or no incentive for lenders to maintain the current large“giveaways” on a Catmark. I believe Cat-qualifying mortgages will become astarting point for borrowers when […]

Bumpy ride in theme park

CGU Financial Management has introduced the Global Suc^_cess unit trust,which will invest globally in companies involved in connectivity,demo^_-graphy, e-business and environmental technology.Commenting on the suitability of the product to the market, Smith says:“Recent turmoil in the technology, media and telecoms markets may havedissuaded investors from committing large sums to this sector, in whichcase there may […]

Societies&#39 lending at two-year high

Building society mortgage lending hit a two-year high in March.Building Societies Association figures show gross lending by societiestotalled 2.4bn in March compared with 1.45bn in February.Approvals, or loans agreed but not yet made, increased by more than 50per cent to 3.38bn from 2bn in February, the highest fig^_ure in over twoyears.The growth of societies is […]

The simple truth about our roles in the industry

The financial services industry is a vital one and good advisers performan undervalued public service. If you had not noticed, it is under veryfierce attack by well meaning but mis guided authority. A one-eyedorang-utan could see what is wrong – if he cared to look.Only independent advisers can give true best advice all the time. […]

Artemis Global Income: Making sense of global markets

The rally in cyclical ‘value’ stocks paused for breath in February, as investors took a more cautious tone and switched their attention back to defensive areas. In this article, Jacob de Tusch-Lec, manager of the Artemis Global Income Fund, explains how he has positioned the portfolio, given the many economic, geopolitical and policy risks that […]

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up

Comments

    Leave a comment