View more on these topics

Blight of the hunter

It might be that Artemis needs to update its mailing list slightly. A whole armada of envelopes arrived at the office of this paper with enticing invitations to a briefing from top profit hunters on the new strategic bond fund, James Foster and Alex Ralph.

We had to go through the history books to spot the people invited by Artemis.

First, there was Peter Kermode, who was investment editor but left a mere seven years ago and is now in property public relations in his native Australia. Then there was an envelope for ex-editor Grant Ringshaw, who left several years ago and is now deputy City editor on the Sunday Telegraph, plus one for the news editor at the time, David Robertson, last heard of on the newsdesk at the Sunday Times. Then there was an invitation for another former editor from around 10 years ago, Patrick Collinson, who now edits the Guardian’s Jobs & Money section.

Remarkably, Artemis failed to send an invitation to anyone who is currently at Money Marketing.l Seems that dress sense is getting ever more casual at awards ceremonies these days. Following on from last year’s performance at the Headline Money awards by Guardian Jobs & Money editor Patrick Collinson, who took the radical step of collecting his gong without a tie, this year saw Sunday Telegraph investment hard man Paul Farrow take to the stage in rolled up shirt-sleeves. Faz claims he was caught unawares, thinking that he hadn’t won. But the Diary wonders if this was, in fact, a Tony Blairesque fashion statement.


Fee spirit

Axa Management and Training management consultant Simon Olive says clients are willing to pay a fee for advice in return for peace of mind, a trusted relationship and a value-added service and advisers can profit by cutting their admin burden and concentrating on a smaller client base paying a retainer.

Stewart Ritchie on pensions

Most of the attention on post-retirement changes from A-day has focused on income withdrawal and Alternatively Secured Pensions, but the changes to annuities merit serious consideration. The Inland Revenue plan to change the way annuities will work in the new pensions tax simplification regime after April 6 2006. The primary legislation for these changes is in Finance Act 2005.


News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up


    Leave a comment