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BlackRock pairs with Tavistock to launch model portfolios

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BlackRock has paired up with Tavistock Investments to launch blended passive and active portfolios.

The eight products will build on the existing Tavistock Acumen Portfolios, which use passives, to blend them with actively-managed funds.

The discretionary fund management fee for the portfolios will be 0.125 per cent plus VAT.

The funds will be volatility targeted, based on research from BlackRock, and will target risk levels from Tavistock’s attitude to risk questionnaire.

“Blending ETF-based portfolios with active strategies can be a cost-effective and flexible way to invest, and we continue to see strong demand for this type of investment. We are pleased to be providing the research data that will support Tavistock’s new proposition,” says Michael Gruener, co-head of EMEA sales for iShares at BlackRock.

Tavistock has around £3bn in assets under advice.

“This is a huge step for Tavistock towards becoming a key influence in the UK financial services sector and we very much look forward to working with BlackRock,” says Brian Raven, chief executive at Tavistock.

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