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Bad apple in the industry leaves a nasty taste

I felt I had to write to express my sympathy with Mark Howard for the


gruelling experience he went through in court in the name of integrity


(Money Marketing, April 6).


Time and time again, the maggot from the bad apple in the crop crawls out


to damage the company which has worked hard at its image, has projected the


caring customer focus expected and set up all the right processes and


procedures to ensure compliance. Why then does this bad apple still exist?


And can we do more to prevent it appearing in the premium crop?


One solution is to make the bad apple feel extremely uncomfortable in


his/her environment and to make it difficult to operate other than in the


most ethical fashion.


Companies need to be viewed as “safe” by their customers and therefore


must develop, enhance and maintain a first-class reputation. Best-practice,


leading-edge companies must have the working and operating environment to


ensure that their reputations will not be tarnished by things which can be


avoided.


New legislation, in the form of the whistleblowing provisions of the


Public Order Disclosure Act, gives greater protection to employees who


raise a concern regarding something intrinsically awry in a company. To


avoid the unscrupulous mischief-making employee from creating havoc, a


company would be much better positioned if it had an internal programme


which flushed out problem areas, weaknesses, broken processes or lack of


compliance.


A full and trusted internal programme enabling a company to control these


issues would avoid negative publicity or at least minimise it, avoid two


days&#39 interrogation in court justifying its actions and will actually


enhance its reputation by being seen to be proactive to applying


closed-loop principles.


The 99.9 per cent of prime-crop apples will understand that they are


working for an honest, caring and ethical company. This will enhance hiring


and retention policies. Economic value of the company is maximised and


customers feel safe.



Sandra Basaran


Managing Director


Janada,


London SW1

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