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b2 launches new marketing campaign

Barclays subsidiary b2 is adding two more Cat marked Isas to its range.


The fund manager is launching a mini stocks and shares Isa linked to its Market Track 350 and Cash Savings Account available through its maxi Isa.


The cash account offers 5.25 per cent and has a interest rate pledge to at least match the Bank of England&#39s base rate until April 5, 2000.


The company is also embarking on a major autumn advertising campaign at the end of September.


The campaign kicks off with a 20 second television commercial again featuring thespian Richard E Grant still on the same desert island as the previous run of adverts.


The campaign which is set to continue to the end of the tax year, will carry the message &#34It is pretty simple to get an Isa from b2&#34.


It will initially be shown in the London and Meridian TV areas which b2 see as key geographical elements to its market.

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