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Allied Irish gets mobile

Allied Irish Banks today announced that it is to rollout a new mobile phone banking service to customers from next month.


Its “24 hour mobile” service is the latest development in the implementation of AIB&#39s strategy for “mobile” commerce.


Subsequent phases will see a range of transaction based financial services using Wap technology. This will include a share dealing service by the end of this year.


This new service will operate on any compatible GSM mobile phone and the latest Wap handsets.


Billy Andrews, AIB General Manager Electronic Banking said: “Our research indicates that people like using mobile phones and I am delighted that AIB can offer a new and secure lifestyle banking service for our customers on the move.”

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